A Brief History of Throwing Shit by Rustum Kozain

Revisiting the pan-African journal CHIMURENGA CHRONIC—within whose pages I just read the most astounding essay about the act of literally throwing shit during African protests. Referenced: the Atlantic slave trade, Nazi death camps, airport crowd processing, and low-income housing planning. A connection is made between treating humans like waste, and those humans turning the tables and actually tossing their shit back at society in protest. A brilliant read. An excerpt can be linked above.

A Brief History of Throwing Shit by Rustum Kozain



Revisiting the pan-African journal CHIMURENGA CHRONIC—within whose pages I just read the most astounding essay about the act of literally throwing shit during African protests. Referenced: the Atlantic slave trade, Nazi death camps, airport crowd processing, and low-income housing planning. A connection is made between treating humans like waste, and those humans turning the tables and actually tossing their shit back at society in protest. A brilliant read. An excerpt can be linked above.

SPRTS #3 ”Taking artists out of the their usual cycle of studio —> gallery; SPRTS, with its public intervention hopes to  crossbreed art with the quotidian experience of sports, and mingle creative types with the athletes of the world, even if the impulse is satire.” 

SPRTS #3 ”Taking artists out of the their usual cycle of studio —> gallery; SPRTS, with its public intervention hopes to  crossbreed art with the quotidian experience of sports, and mingle creative types with the athletes of the world, even if the impulse is satire.” 

We’re excited to have finally gotten in, after many, many entreaties and much finagling, CHIMURENGA CHRONIC, a pan-African gazette of the “now-now”. Internationally produced, its genesis is South African, with cultural funding from Germany. From their own lips:

"…a publication borne out of an urgent need to write our world differently, to begin asking new questions, or even the old ones anew. When will the new emerge – and if it is already here, how do we decipher it? In which ways do people live their lives with joy and creativity and beauty, sometimes amid suffering and violence, and sometimes perpendicular to it? How do people fashion routines and make sense of the world in the face of the temporariness or volatility that defines so many of the arrangements of social existence here? These questions loom over a contemporary Africa. Yet most knowledge produced on the continent remains heavily reliant on simplistic and rigid categories unable to capture the complexities that inflect so much of contemporary quotidian life here."

So, in addition to a robust book supplement insert, there are thoughtful pieces on Apartheid litigation (and its effects), the “throwing of shit” in protests, “critical futurity”, “philatelic time travel” (and postage stamps) in film, and a profound, blistering piece by Youssef Rakha on events in Egypt. And MORE, MORE, MORE. Read Chimurenga Chronic, do….

We’re excited to have finally gotten in, after many, many entreaties and much finagling, CHIMURENGA CHRONIC, a pan-African gazette of the “now-now”. Internationally produced, its genesis is South African, with cultural funding from Germany. From their own lips:


"…a publication borne out of an urgent need to write our world differently, to begin asking new questions, or even the old ones anew. When will the new emerge – and if it is already here, how do we decipher it? In which ways do people live their lives with joy and creativity and beauty, sometimes amid suffering and violence, and sometimes perpendicular to it? How do people fashion routines and make sense of the world in the face of the temporariness or volatility that defines so many of the arrangements of social existence here? These questions loom over a contemporary Africa. Yet most knowledge produced on the continent remains heavily reliant on simplistic and rigid categories unable to capture the complexities that inflect so much of contemporary quotidian life here."


So, in addition to a robust book supplement insert, there are thoughtful pieces on Apartheid litigation (and its effects), the “throwing of shit” in protests, “critical futurity”, “philatelic time travel” (and postage stamps) in film, and a profound, blistering piece by Youssef Rakha on events in Egypt. And MORE, MORE, MORE. Read Chimurenga Chronic, do….

New CR Fashion: The Queen has the cover naturally. Gigi Hadid is back from the country and this time girlishly metropolitan. Can’t tell if the Kardashi-esque overcoat is caustic or not, but admittedly I like B better in sweaters. She says, “…If I put my hand to the TV. That’s the first time I remember prayer, an electric current humming through me. ” Meanwhile we all wake up to Video Phone playing on internal repeat. Very spiritual…

It’s here, it’s leer, it’s cheer, it’s….dear… I don’t know. Fashion. It’s fashion week NYC with people driving around in Mercedes, or something. PURPLE FASHION Fall Winter 2014/2015, Let’s celebrate (Ames says I’m old for liking PF so dearly (but oh I do!))….Tom Sachs Purple Book insert! Barbara Kruger on new forms of activism! Purple travel (Kinshasa, Congo)! My dear filthy ol’ G Paul McCarthy! FASHION…

It’s here, it’s leer, it’s cheer, it’s….dear… I don’t know. Fashion. It’s fashion week NYC with people driving around in Mercedes, or something. PURPLE FASHION Fall Winter 2014/2015, Let’s celebrate (Ames says I’m old for liking PF so dearly (but oh I do!))….Tom Sachs Purple Book insert! Barbara Kruger on new forms of activism! Purple travel (Kinshasa, Congo)! My dear filthy ol’ G Paul McCarthy! FASHION

Great essay in THE PITCHFORK REVIEW #3 on “the black male sexual gaze” as seen in some gay rapper music videos on YouTube as well as D’Angelo’s infamous “Untitled” video. People, TPR is the real deal! Engaging music journalism like you never dreamed, reminiscent of the 70s, except, like, now or whatever they call this decade’s years… (Teens? Tens?)

Great essay in THE PITCHFORK REVIEW #3 on “the black male sexual gaze” as seen in some gay rapper music videos on YouTube as well as D’Angelo’s infamous “Untitled” video. People, TPR is the real deal! Engaging music journalism like you never dreamed, reminiscent of the 70s, except, like, now or whatever they call this decade’s years… (Teens? Tens?)

God, how I love TIN HOUSE. “Tribes” issue”.


"Globalism’s ascendance was supposed to send tribalism the way of the dodo. Yet from Waziristan to Williamsburg, tribal affiliations still dictate social order. There may now be more societal fluidity, but finding one’s tribe within nomadic urban cultures has never felt more urgent. And the tales told within ancient or temporary tribes shape and define these societal organizations. In this issue we turn to our favorite storytellers and poets, hoping to arrest time long enough for them to show us what life is like in our contemporary tribes."

God, how I love TIN HOUSE. “Tribes” issue”.

"Globalism’s ascendance was supposed to send tribalism the way of the dodo. Yet from Waziristan to Williamsburg, tribal affiliations still dictate social order. There may now be more societal fluidity, but finding one’s tribe within nomadic urban cultures has never felt more urgent. And the tales told within ancient or temporary tribes shape and define these societal organizations. In this issue we turn to our favorite storytellers and poets, hoping to arrest time long enough for them to show us what life is like in our contemporary tribes."

ISRAEL and PALESTINE. Harper’s Magazine, September 2014. “Where to go from here.” A forum taken from a conversation at the Jerusalem YMCA on June 15th.With Bernard Avishai, Dani Dayan, Forsan Hussein, Eva Illouz, Bassim Khoury,Erel Margalit, Danny Rubinstein, and Khalil Shikaki.



PART ONE: “We live so close to each other, yet we know so little about each other.”



PART TWO: “We are not a fort. We are a hub.”



PART THREE: “Palestine is not Jordan.”



PART FOUR: “The Kerry Intifada.”

ISRAEL and PALESTINE. Harper’s Magazine, September 2014. “Where to go from here.” A forum taken from a conversation at the Jerusalem YMCA on June 15th.

With Bernard Avishai, Dani Dayan, Forsan Hussein, Eva Illouz, Bassim Khoury,Erel Margalit, Danny Rubinstein, and Khalil Shikaki.

PART ONE: “We live so close to each other, yet we know so little about each other.”

PART TWO: “We are not a fort. We are a hub.”

PART THREE: “Palestine is not Jordan.”

PART FOUR: “The Kerry Intifada.”

It’s still summer, people, hasn’t gone anywhere YET. You can still get down with the “superyacht-sized” MONOCLE MEDITERRANEO newspaper. Why you ask? Summer, beaches, boating. “What?” you say. “Italo-pop”, I say. Tunisian holidays. Alfresco cinemas of Athens and Mykonos. White summer wardrobe. Milanese architecture on the Italian Riviera. Yachting. SUMMER DAMMIT!!! (What? you say? What? Oh. At least you can read about it….)

It’s been years since the beloved 'Sup graced us with a new issue (and apparently will indeed be some time before another official one). Until then we have this limited “special edition” mini-issue centered around the ‘Sup team’s music-festival-out-in-a-desert-oasis, DAY IN THE DESERT, gloriously designed by Richard Turley, “hand-spray-painted and individually poly-bagged”. Can’t say I know any of the bands, and barely much of the noise ‘n grace movement, but by the look of these pages, and the stories within, it appears to have been a spiritual enriching experience indeed.

It’s been years since the beloved 'Sup graced us with a new issue (and apparently will indeed be some time before another official one). Until then we have this limited “special edition” mini-issue centered around the ‘Sup team’s music-festival-out-in-a-desert-oasis, DAY IN THE DESERT, gloriously designed by Richard Turley, hand-spray-painted and individually poly-bagged”. Can’t say I know any of the bands, and barely much of the noise ‘n grace movement, but by the look of these pages, and the stories within, it appears to have been a spiritual enriching experience indeed.