We’re not quite sure what IDEOLOGIE ("a triumph of style") is, but we have it (and kinda dig it): "A spectre is haunting the world—-the spectre of fashion. All the powers of white magic have entered into an unholy alliance to exorcise this spectre, to capture it, to learn to cast a glamour. Where is the opposition that has not hurled back the branding approach? In warfare, one’s helmet should have a panache. What we lack in veracity, we make up in ideologie." Compadres of n+1.

We’re not quite sure what IDEOLOGIE ("a triumph of style") is, but we have it (and kinda dig it): "A spectre is haunting the world—-the spectre of fashion. All the powers of white magic have entered into an unholy alliance to exorcise this spectre, to capture it, to learn to cast a glamour. Where is the opposition that has not hurled back the branding approach? In warfare, one’s helmet should have a panache. What we lack in veracity, we make up in ideologie." Compadres of n+1.

HOLO, issue #1. Their mandate: "Consumer electronics have obsolesced science fiction, museums are promising digital revolutions, and laboratories have set up artist-in-residence programs. While the edges of science and technology can be disorienting, we see both PERIL and POSSIBILITY." (Capitals ours.)



"Towering installations visualizing scientific data, robotic assemblies turned kinetic sculptures, responsive 3D-printed environments that mimic life—as consumer electronics become indistinguishable from science fiction, contemporary artists and designers are prototyping fantastical futures before our very eyes."

Yesterday Leipzig. Today Montreal. Tomorrow Rome. Je me souviens…Je me souviens.

Yesterday Leipzig. Today Montreal. Tomorrow Rome. Je me souviens…Je me souviens.

dispactke:

Twenty-five years of THE BAFFLER, online. Nice.

Nice, indeed.

dispactke:

Twenty-five years of THE BAFFLER, online. Nice.

Nice, indeed.

It’s. Here: CHALET, Issue 002. Cycling through Montréal (and NYC). "In Montréal, chaos, corruption and decay go hand-in-hand with freewheeling joie-de-vivre and creativity."

It’s. Here: CHALET, Issue 002. Cycling through Montréal (and NYC). "In Montréal, chaos, corruption and decay go hand-in-hand with freewheeling joie-de-vivre and creativity."

Coming off their previous issue, mainly a music issue (rather than the usual partial music), MOOD gets back to what they do best with a unique focus on urban and alternative foodstuffs: fiddlehead toasts, cool San Francisco restaurants, the “Almighty” Robert Mitchum rum drink (and Calypso album), the Snacky Tunes radio show hosted in the backyard of Roberta’s in Brooklyn, drinking games, cuisine at Rockaway Beach, the usual.

Coming off their previous issue, mainly a music issue (rather than the usual partial music), MOOD gets back to what they do best with a unique focus on urban and alternative foodstuffs: fiddlehead toasts, cool San Francisco restaurants, the “Almighty” Robert Mitchum rum drink (and Calypso album), the Snacky Tunes radio show hosted in the backyard of Roberta’s in Brooklyn, drinking games, cuisine at Rockaway Beach, the usual.

Books, the physicality of books, is THE SHELF's (#3) mandate, its subject matter. It is a beautifully produced journal dedicated to publishing design and what the publishers like to call, “the cult of the shelf”. Volumes, bookstores, rare editions, magazines, libraries, journals, private collections. (Each book on THE SHELF’s cover represents a book mentioned in the issue, in addition to those from past issues.)

Books, the physicality of books, is THE SHELF's (#3) mandate, its subject matter. It is a beautifully produced journal dedicated to publishing design and what the publishers like to call, “the cult of the shelf”. Volumes, bookstores, rare editions, magazines, libraries, journals, private collections. (Each book on THE SHELF’s cover represents a book mentioned in the issue, in addition to those from past issues.)

Rem Koolhaas. Edition of CLOG.
BornRemment Lucas Koolhaas17 November 1944 (age 69)Rotterdam, NetherlandsNationality DutchAlma Mater Architectural Association School ofArchitecture, Cornell UniversityAwardsPritzker Prize (2000)Praemium Imperiale (2003)Royal Gold Medal (2004)Practice Office for Metropolitan ArchitectureSelected BuildingsCasa da Música in PortoSeattle Central LibraryNetherlands Embassy BerlinChina Central Television Headquarters

Rem Koolhaas. Edition of CLOG.

Born
Remment Lucas Koolhaas
17 November 1944 (age 69)
Rotterdam, Netherlands

Nationality
Dutch

Alma Mater
Architectural Association School of
Architecture, Cornell University

Awards
Pritzker Prize (2000)
Praemium Imperiale (2003)
Royal Gold Medal (2004)

Practice
Office for Metropolitan Architecture

Selected Buildings
Casa da Música in Porto
Seattle Central Library
Netherlands Embassy Berlin
China Central Television Headquarters

The nearly forgotten AMERICAN APHRODITE, per The Paris Review. ”Smuthound” Samuel Roth’s journal of the finest in literary smut, a quarterly for the “fancy-free”.

"American Aphrodite usually featured things like mild erotic line drawings, some piece of long-out-of-print British literature (the “scandalous” seventeenth-century plays of Aphra Behn appear in many issues), a “bawdy” new translation from Chaucer, and something truly shocking…."

dispactke:

Of Flying Cars and the Declining Rate of Profit
by DAVID GRAEBER
I’ve been immersed in this David Graeber essay from a 2012 issue of THE BAFFLER. It’s all over the place but makes some arresting points about technology and contemporary societies. Hard to know exactly what he’s getting at (he’s a professed anarchist), but a lot of what he says is intellectually engaging. Some (extended) random excerpts: "A secret question hovers over us, a sense of disappointment, a broken promise we were given as children about what our adult world was supposed to be like.""Where, in short, are the flying cars? Where are the force fields, tractor beams, teleportation pods, antigravity sleds, tricorders, immortality drugs, colonies on Mars, and all the other technological wonders any child growing up in the mid-to-late twentieth century assumed would exist by now?""Might the cultural sensibility that came to be referred to as postmodernism best be seen as a prolonged meditation on all the technological changes that never happened?""The technologies that have advanced since the seventies are mainly either medical technologies or information technologies—largely, technologies of simulation.""Alvin Toffler’s 1970 best seller Future Shock argued that almost all the social problems of the sixties could be traced back to the increasing pace of technological change. The endless outpouring of scientific breakthroughs transformed the grounds of daily existence, and left Americans without any clear idea of what normal life was.""Toffler’s use of acceleration was particularly unfortunate. For most of human history, the top speed at which human beings could travel had been around 25 miles per hour. By 1900 it had increased to 100 miles per hour, and for the next seventy years it did seem to be increasing exponentially. By the time Toffler was writing, in 1970, the record for the fastest speed at which any human had traveled stood at roughly 25,000 mph, achieved by the crew of Apollo 10 in 1969, just one year before. At such an exponential rate, it must have seemed reasonable to assume that within a matter of decades, humanity would be exploring other solar systems.""Since 1970, no further increase has occurred.""In fact, the United States never did abandon gigantic, government-controlled schemes of technological development. Mainly, they just shifted to military research—and not just to Soviet-scale schemes like Star Wars, but to weapons projects, research in communications and surveillance technologies, and similar security-related concerns.""Meanwhile, despite unprecedented investment in research on medicine and life sciences, we await cures for cancer and the common cold, and the most dramatic medical breakthroughs we have seen have taken the form of drugs such as Prozac, Zoloft, or Ritalin—tailor-made to ensure that the new work demands don’t drive us completely, dysfunctionally crazy.""The Internet is a remarkable innovation, but all we are talking about is a super-fast and globally accessible combination of library, post office, and mail-order catalogue.""There was a time when academia was society’s refuge for the eccentric, brilliant, and impractical. No longer. It is now the domain of professional self-marketers." "No, they mean to convince us that technological progress is indeed continuing, that we do live in a world of wonders, but that those wonders take the form of modest improvements (the latest iPhone!), rumors of inventions about to happen (“I hear they are going to have flying cars pretty soon”), complex ways of juggling information and imagery, and still more complex platforms for filling out of forms."

dispactke:

Of Flying Cars and the Declining Rate of Profit

by DAVID GRAEBER

I’ve been immersed in this David Graeber essay from a 2012 issue of THE BAFFLER. It’s all over the place but makes some arresting points about technology and contemporary societies. Hard to know exactly what he’s getting at (he’s a professed anarchist), but a lot of what he says is intellectually engaging. Some (extended) random excerpts: 

"A secret question hovers over us, a sense of disappointment, a broken promise we were given as children about what our adult world was supposed to be like."

"Where, in short, are the flying cars? Where are the force fields, tractor beams, teleportation pods, antigravity sleds, tricorders, immortality drugs, colonies on Mars, and all the other technological wonders any child growing up in the mid-to-late twentieth century assumed would exist by now?"

"Might the cultural sensibility that came to be referred to as postmodernism best be seen as a prolonged meditation on all the technological changes that never happened?"

"The technologies that have advanced since the seventies are mainly either medical technologies or information technologies—largely, technologies of simulation."

"Alvin Toffler’s 1970 best seller Future Shock argued that almost all the social problems of the sixties could be traced back to the increasing pace of technological change. The endless outpouring of scientific breakthroughs transformed the grounds of daily existence, and left Americans without any clear idea of what normal life was."

"Toffler’s use of acceleration was particularly unfortunate. For most of human history, the top speed at which human beings could travel had been around 25 miles per hour. By 1900 it had increased to 100 miles per hour, and for the next seventy years it did seem to be increasing exponentially. By the time Toffler was writing, in 1970, the record for the fastest speed at which any human had traveled stood at roughly 25,000 mph, achieved by the crew of Apollo 10 in 1969, just one year before. At such an exponential rate, it must have seemed reasonable to assume that within a matter of decades, humanity would be exploring other solar systems."

"Since 1970, no further increase has occurred."

"In fact, the United States never did abandon gigantic, government-controlled schemes of technological development. Mainly, they just shifted to military research—and not just to Soviet-scale schemes like Star Wars, but to weapons projects, research in communications and surveillance technologies, and similar security-related concerns."

"Meanwhile, despite unprecedented investment in research on medicine and life sciences, we await cures for cancer and the common cold, and the most dramatic medical breakthroughs we have seen have taken the form of drugs such as Prozac, Zoloft, or Ritalin—tailor-made to ensure that the new work demands don’t drive us completely, dysfunctionally crazy."

"The Internet is a remarkable innovation, but all we are talking about is a super-fast and globally accessible combination of library, post office, and mail-order catalogue."

"There was a time when academia was society’s refuge for the eccentric, brilliant, and impractical. No longer. It is now the domain of professional self-marketers." 

"No, they mean to convince us that technological progress is indeed continuing, that we do live in a world of wonders, but that those wonders take the form of modest improvements (the latest iPhone!), rumors of inventions about to happen (“I hear they are going to have flying cars pretty soon”), complex ways of juggling information and imagery, and still more complex platforms for filling out of forms."